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Arizona

Arizona

Incentives/Policies for Renewables & Efficiency

Printable Version
Energy Efficiency Standards   

Last DSIRE Review: 11/12/2012
Program Overview:
State: Arizona
Incentive Type: Energy Efficiency Resource Standard
Eligible Efficiency Technologies: Custom/Others pending approval
Applicable Sectors: Investor-Owned Utility, Rural Electric Cooperative
Electric Sales Reduction22% cumulative savings by 2020
Natural Gas Sales Reduction6% cumulative savings by 2020
Authority 1:
AAC R14-2-2401, et seq. (electricity standard)
Authority 2:
AAC R14-2-2501, et seq. (natural gas standard)
Summary:

Electricity Standard

The Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) adopted rules in August 2010 requiring certain electric utilities in the state to meet prescribed energy efficiency requirements. The rules pertain to public service companies providing retail electric service and having annual revenue of more than $5 million; however, electric distribution cooperatives have to propose a goal for each year to achieve at least 75% of the savings requirement.

By 2020 every IOU must achieve cumulative savings equal to 22% of their previous year’s retail electric sales. For example, a utility with 2019 sales of 100,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh) must achieve a total savings of 22,000 kWh by 2020. The first year for compliance is 2011, during which time utilities must save 1.25% of their 2010 electricity sales. The requirement ramps up over time according to the following schedule:

Calendar Year Energy Efficiency Standard
2011 1.25%
2012 3.00%
2013 5.00%
2014 7.25%
2015 9.50%
2016 12.00%
2017 14.50%
2018 17.00%
2019 19.50%
2020 22.00%


Utilities can meet their savings requirements through a variety of means:

  • Demand-side management (DSM). Utilities can provide incentives for their customers to replace existing equipment or processes with more energy efficient options, and can count those savings towards their goal.
  • Peak demand reductions. Utilities can count peak demand reductions resulting from demand response and load management programs toward their requirement. To quantify the kWh savings of a demand response program, utilities can assume a 50% annual load factor. The total amount of savings that can come from peak demand reductions is limited to 2 percentage points in 2020 (~9% of the requirement).
  • Old DSM. Savings achieved through DSM programs offered between 2004 and 2011 can be counted towards the requirement. The savings, limited to 4% of 2005 energy sales, will be allocated in years 2016 through 2020 as demonstrated in the ACC’s rules.
  • Building codes. Utilities are permitted to count up to one third of the energy savings associated with energy efficient building codes. The energy savings must be quantified through a measurement and evaluation study conducted by the utility.
  • Combined heat and power (CHP). CHP installations not used to comply with the renewable energy standard may be counted as energy savings.
  • Self-direction. Utilities may count energy savings achieved by their customers through their own initiative.

Electric investor-owned utilities with revenues in excess of $5 million annually must submit to the ACC on June 1 of every odd year an implementation plan describing how the utility will comply with the requirements of the rules, except that the first implementation plan for IOUs is due by January 31, 2011. Electric distribution cooperatives with revenues in excess of $5 million annually must submit to the ACC on June 1 of every odd year an implementation plan for each DSM program the utility will be administering in the next two calendar years. The implementation plan should have a goal of achieving 75% of the efficiency requirements imposed upon IOUs for that year.

 

Natural Gas Standard

The ACC also established energy efficiency requirements for all gas utilities through a decision rendered in December 2010. By 2020 every gas utility must achieve cumulative savings equal to 6% of their previous year’s retail sales. The first year for compliance is 2011, during which time utilities must save 1.25% of their 2010 electricity sales. The requirement ramps up over time according to the following schedule:

Calendar Year

Energy Efficiency Standard
2011 0.50%
2012 1.20%
2013 1.80%
2014 2.40%
2015 3.00%
2016 3.60%
2017 4.20%
2018 4.80%
2019 5.40%
2020 6.00%

Utilities can meet their energy savings requirements through a variety of means:

  • Demand-side management (DSM) and renewable energy technlogy (RET) incentive programs. At least 75% of the efficiency requirement for each year must come from DSM or RET incentive programs.
  • Old DSM. Savings achieved through DSM programs offered between 2004 and 2011 can be counted towards a portion of the requirement as demonstrated in the ACC’s rules.
  • Building codes. Utilities are permitted to count up to one third of the energy savings associated with energy efficient building codes. The energy savings must be quantified through a measurement and evaluation study conducted by the utility.
  • Self-direction. Utilities may count energy savings achieved by their customers through their own initiative.

 
Contact:
  Barbara Keene
Arizona Corporation Commission
1200 W. Washington St.
Phoenix, AZ 85007
Phone: (602) 542-0853
Fax: (602) 364-2270
E-Mail: bkeene@azcc.gov
Web Site: http://www.azcc.gov
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Disclaimer: The information presented on the DSIRE web site provides an unofficial overview of financial incentives and other policies. It does not constitute professional tax advice or other professional financial guidance, and it should not be used as the only source of information when making purchasing decisions, investment decisions or tax decisions, or when executing other binding agreements. Please refer to the individual contact provided below each summary to verify that a specific financial incentive or other policy applies to your project.

While the DSIRE staff strives to provide the best information possible, the DSIRE staff, the N.C. Solar Center, N.C. State University and the Interstate Renewable Energy Council, Inc. make no representations or warranties, either express or implied, concerning the accuracy, completeness, reliability or suitability of the information. The DSIRE staff, the N.C. Solar Center, N.C. State University and the Interstate Renewable Energy Council, Inc. disclaim all liability of any kind arising out of your use or misuse of the information contained or referenced on DSIRE Web pages.

Copyright 2013 - 2014 North Carolina State University, under NREL Subcontract No. XEU-0-99515-01. Permission granted only for personal or educational use, or for use by or on behalf of the U.S. government. North Carolina State University prohibits the unauthorized display, reproduction, sale, and/or distribution of all or portions of the content of the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE) without prior, written consent.